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Memories

curl left 25thday ofJulyin the year2014 curl right
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petite-piaf:

Robert Taylor and Greta Garbo in Camille (d. George Cukor 1936)

(via bellecs)

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the white queen // first & last appearances

(Source: sambarks, via queenwydville)

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Do the good for England you’ve dreamed of and then we can be happy

(Source: ducavalentino, via queenwydville)

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bethwoodvilles:

Queens of England + Catherine Parr (1512-1548)

Catherine was born in 1512, the oldest surviving child of Sir Thomas Parr and Maud Green. The Parr’s were a substantial northern family and Catherine’s father was a close companion to Henry VIII. Her mother had been a close friend and attendant to Catherine of Aragon who was her godmother and whom she was likely named after. 

As a child, Catherine received the normal education of a well-born woman but she developed a great passion for learning. She became fluent in French, Latin, Italian, and later as queen, Spanish. In 1529, she married Sir Edward Borough, a justice of the peace. He died after just four years of marriage. Being a widow, Catherine then spent time with the Dowager Lady Strickland, Catherine Neville, the widow of her cousin. In 1534 she married a kinsman of Lady Strickland, John Neville, Baron Latimer. Latimer was twice Catherine’s age and already twice-widowed. 

Latimer was a supporter of the Roman Catholic Church and opposed the king’s divorce and his subsequent marriage to Anne Boleyn. As a result, life was difficult for the Latimer’s and they spent most of their time in the south. After the death of Thomas Cromwell in 1540, the family moved to London as Latimer attended Parliament. The court atmosphere was a different experience from the rural estates that Catherine was used to. It was at court that Catherine first met Sir Thomas Seymour. Latimer died in 1543, leaving Catherine in charge of his affairs until his daughter’s majority. He also left her properties and income, making her a rich widow. 

Using her mother’s friendship with Henry’s first queen, Catherine renewed her friendship with the queen’s daughter, Lady Mary. She soon established herself as part of Mary’s household and it was here that she came to the attention of Henry. Despite a growing romantic friendship with Seymour, Catherine felt it was her duty to accept Henry’s proposal and Seymour was sent abroad to remove him from the court.

Catherine married Henry in July 1543 at Hampton Court Place. She was the first Queen of England to also be Queen of Ireland following Henry’s adoption of the title King of Ireland. As queen, Catherine developed good relationships with all of Henry’s children. She was also influential in the passing of the Third Succession Act in 1543 which restored both Mary and Elizabeth to the line of succession.

When Henry went on his last unsuccessful campaign to France in 1544, Catherine was left as his regent. Because her regency council was composed of sympathetic members, Catherine obtained effective control over it and ruled as she saw fit. She handled provisions, finances, and musters for the French campaign. She signed five royal proclamations and maintained in contact with the lieutenant in the northern Marches concerning the unstable situation in Scotland. 

In 1546, Catholic and anti-Protestant officials tried to turn the king against her for her Protestant sympathies and there was a warrant for her arrest. Catherine was able to reconcile with king and nothing came of the warrant. When Henry died in 1547, he left her a generous provision to support herself. She retired to her home in Chelsea after the coronation of Edward VI in January 1547.

Just six months after Henry’s death, Catherine secretly married Thomas Seymour which caused a minor scandal. In August 1548 she gave birth to her only child, Mary, and died six days later from childbed fever. She was buried in the Sudeley Castle chapel. (x)

(via queenwydville)

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vivelareine:

lordmarlborough:

Alan Rickman as Louis XIV in the forthcoming “A Little Chaos” which also stars Kate Winslett. You can bet this is on my cinematic agenda!

Oo I haven’t heard of this! It sounds interesting!
(Maybe not as out there as the upcoming film with Pierce Brosnan as Louis XIV that also involves mermaids, but still)
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vivelareine:

lordmarlborough:

Alan Rickman as Louis XIV in the forthcoming “A Little Chaos” which also stars Kate Winslett. You can bet this is on my cinematic agenda!

Oo I haven’t heard of this! It sounds interesting!

(Maybe not as out there as the upcoming film with Pierce Brosnan as Louis XIV that also involves mermaids, but still)

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tiny-librarian:

Get to Known me Meme, Royalist Edition

[8/10] Monarchs - Henry VIII

His Majesty is the handsomest potentate I ever set eyes on; above the usual height, with an extremely fine calf to his leg, his complexion very fair and bright, with auburn hair combed straight and short, in the French fashion, his throat being rather long and thick.  He was born on the 28th of June, 1491, so he will enter his twenty-fifth year the month after next.  He speaks French, English, and Latin, and a little Italian, plays well on the lute and harpsichord, sings from book at sight, draws the bow with greater strength  than any man in England, and jousts marvelously.  Believe me, he is in every respect a most accomplished Prince; and I, who have now seen all the sovereigns in Christendom, and last of all these two of France and England in such great state, might well rest content.

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fuckyeahcostumedramas:

Costume Porn- Dangerous Liaisons (1988).

"When I came out into society I was 15. I already knew that the role I was condemned to, namely to keep quiet and do what I was told, gave me the perfect opportunity to listen and observe. Not to what people told me, which naturally was of no interest, but to whatever it was they were trying to hide. I practiced detachment. I learned how to look cheerful while under the table I stuck a fork into the back of my hand. I became a virtuoso of deceit. It wasn’t pleasure I was after, it was knowledge. I consulted the strictest moralists to learn how to appear, philosophers to find out what to think, and novelists to see what I could get away with, and in the end, I distilled everything to one wonderfully simple principle: win or die."

(via vivelareine)

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ephemeral-elegance:

Machine Embroidered Jacket, ca. 1890s

Owned by Jessie Mason Webb

via NDSU

(via joachimmurat)

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