scrollwork top

Memories

curl left 21stday ofSeptemberin the year2014 curl right
¤
top border

Greta Garbo, The Mysterious Lady — 1928
bottom border

Greta Garbo, The Mysterious Lady — 1928

(Source: sourvix, via bellecs)

¤
top border
bottom border

lamus-dworski:

Andrzej Wiktor: “Buchurt” cycle [source].

¤
top border
hairstorical-society:

Nearly 2,000 years ago, at a time when Egypt was under the control of the Roman Empire, a young woman with an elaborate hairstyle was laid to rest only yards away from a king’s pyramid, researchers report.
…
High-resolution CT scans reveal that, before she was buried, her hair was dressed in an elaborate hairstyle.
"The mummy’s hair is readily appreciable, with longer strands at the middle of the scalp drawn back into twists or plaits that were then wound into a tutulus, or chignon at the vertex (crown) of the head," writes a research team in a paper published recently in the journal RSNA RadioGraphics. They note that it was a popular hairstyle at the time, which may have been inspired by a Roman empress, Faustina I, who lived in the second century. 
Source
bottom border

hairstorical-society:

Nearly 2,000 years ago, at a time when Egypt was under the control of the Roman Empire, a young woman with an elaborate hairstyle was laid to rest only yards away from a king’s pyramid, researchers report.

High-resolution CT scans reveal that, before she was buried, her hair was dressed in an elaborate hairstyle.

"The mummy’s hair is readily appreciable, with longer strands at the middle of the scalp drawn back into twists or plaits that were then wound into a tutulus, or chignon at the vertex (crown) of the head," writes a research team in a paper published recently in the journal RSNA RadioGraphics. They note that it was a popular hairstyle at the time, which may have been inspired by a Roman empress, Faustina I, who lived in the second century. 

Source

(via jaded-mandarin)

¤
Introverts don’t get lonely if they don’t socialize with a lot of people, but we do get lonely if we don’t have intimate interactions on a regular basis. 
—I have never related to a quote more in my life than I do this one right here, right now. BAM.  (via kbfoto)

(Source: kbfoto, via edwardslovelyelizabeth)

¤
top border
bottom border

rosiebabbit:

the-bookwhisperer:

silentyetfriendly:

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets Outtake.  The snake head of Jason’s Lucius cane gets caught in Dan’s robes. 

sorry, love

the head touch

this is so fucking cute

(Source: littlechinesedoll, via tiny-librarian)

¤
top border
fashionsfromhistory:

Cape
Late 18th Century 
MET
bottom border

fashionsfromhistory:

Cape

Late 18th Century 

MET

(via calonari)

¤
top border
bottom border

eros-turannos:

The Four Marys: Fleming, Livingston, Seton, and Beaton, ladies-in-waiting to Mary Queen of Scots. Referenced off various court portraits from the 1560s, since there are no existing contemporary portraits of the four, but it was fun to interpret what we know about them. I’ll quote some bits from Fraser:

  • Mary Fleming: Descended from the royal Stewarts, like her queen. “As her beauty bloomed, her remarkable combination of looks and vitality made her, in the opinion of Leslie, ‘the flower of the flock’… which the fair Fleming owed perhaps to her share of Stuart blood.” She was nicknamed “La Flaminia” and Thomas Randolph described her as “a Venus for beauty, a Minerva for wit, and a Juno in wealth”.
  • Mary Livingston: Nicknamed “Lusty”, she was athletic and lively. As part of John Knox’s efforts to blacken Mary’s court he wrote of Livingston, “It was weill knawin that schame haistit mariage between Johne Sempill, callit the Danser, and Marie Levingstoune, surnameit the Lustie”. However, Fraser says, she “owed her nickname of the Lusty to her energetic habit of dancing rather than to any raging physical appetites… The truth was that Mary Livingston was a girl of high spirits and exceptional vivacity, two qualities which were scarcely likely to commend her to Knox.”
  • Mary Seton: More sober and quiet than the others, Fraser describes her as “The meekest of the four… The only Marie to remain unmarried, and the only one therefore to follow her queen into captivity, Mary Seton had a naturally devout nature, and also a certain amount of pardonable family pride – the Setons being among the grandest of the Scottish court families, and her father and brother in turn playing a leading part as magnates, loyal to the crown.” After the queen’s execution Seton spent the last years of her life in a convent.
  • Mary Beaton: Huh, well, we don’t know too much about her life and Fraser doesn’t have too much to say about her, though she calls her “the most classically beautiful of the four”. The description most bandied about regarding Beaton is that she was “pretty and plump, with fair hair and dark eyes”. Like the other four Marys she was educated alongside the queen and her handwriting was most similar to the queen’s, and it’s been long speculated that it was Beaton’s hand that wrote the infamous Casket letters that incriminated and discredited Mary, but I think it would be heartbreakingly awful if it were true.

(via catalinadetrastamara)

¤
top border

Byzantium: the lost empire —-> Empress Theodora (Eva Green) 500 – 28 June 548
“The imperial purple makes the best shroud.”
― Empress Theodora
Theodora was the wife of Justinian I who was crowned Emperor of the Byzantine Empire in 527 AD. As his wife, she ruled by his side, as his partner, and her intelligence helped to advance the Empire.
The exact place of her birth has not been agreed upon. While some historians say she was born on the island of Crete off the coast of Greece, others speculate that she might have been born in Syria. Whichever the case, she was brought up as the daughter of a bear trainer who worked at the Hippodrome (a huge stadium-like circus), in Constantinople. She worked there as a mime, and later as a full time actress. At the time, acting was not a highly esteemed occupation especially for women, so the term ‘actress’ was considered synonymous with the term ‘prostitute’. While on stage she was remembered for her daring entertainment skills, off stage however, she lived a normal youthful life and was most remembered for her wild parties.
At the age of 16, she traveled to northern Africa as the companion of an official. She stayed there for 4 years before returning to Constantinople. She stopped by Alexandria, the capital of Egypt and here she adopted Monophysitism. This was a form of Christianity that believed that Jesus Christ was wholly divine and not both human and divine as was the orthodox Christian belief. Monophysites were thus not liked by orthodox Christians since their teachings did not conform to those of the orthodox church. On conversion to Monophysitism, she gave up her former lifestyle, and upon reaching Constantinople in 522, settled down as a wool spinner in a house near the palace of the Emperor. It was while in this humble lifestyle, at the age of 20, that she drew the attention of Justinian, then a government official.
Theodora was not only beautiful, but intelligent, witty and amusing, which is perhaps why she won Justinian’s love so much that he appealed against an old Roman law that forbade officials from marrying actresses in order to marry her. Justinian and Theodora were married in 525. In 527, Justin, the emperor of Byzantium, and Justinian’s father died. The couple assumed control of the Empire and were crowned Emperor and Empress on 4th April of that same year. They ruled unofficially as joint monarchs with Justinian allowing Theodora to share his throne and take active part in decision making.
Perhaps the most significant event during Empress Theodora’s rule was the Nika revolt in which she proved herself a worthy and able leader. During this event, two rival political groups started a riot at the Hippodrome. They set many public buildings on fire and proclaimed a new emperor. Justinian and his officials, unable to control the crowd prepared to flee, but Theodora spoke up and gave a moving speech about the greater significance of the life of someone who died as a ruler, over that of someone who lived but was nothing. Her determined speech convinced Justinian and his officials and they attacked the Hippodrome, killing over 30,000 rebels and emerging victorious. Historians agree that it was Theodora’s courage and determination that saved Justinian’s empire.
Throughout the rest of her life, Theodora and Justinian transformed the city of Constantinople, building it into a city that for many centuries was known as one of the most wonderful cities in the world. They built aqueducts, bridges, and more than 25 churches, the most significant of these being the Hagia Sophia - ‘Church of Holy Wisdom’. To women, Theodora may well be considered a noble pioneer of the women’s liberation movement. She passed on laws prohibiting forced prostitution and established homes for prostitutes, passed rights that granted women more rights in divorce cases, instituted the death penalty for rape and established laws allowing women to own and inherit property. She also provided safe shelter for Monophysite leaders who faced opposition from the majority orthodox Christians, even though her husband Justinian was an orthodox Christian.
Empress Theodora died on 28th June, 548. Her body was buried in the Church of the Holy Apostle, one of the splendid churches that she and Justinian had built in Constantinople. Beautiful mosaics in Empress Theodora’s remembrance exist to this day at the Church of San Vitale at Ravenna in Northern Italy. Even after her death, her spirit lived on, and in this way she was able to have influence on the Empire. Through what she had began, Justinian was able to bring harmony between the Monophysites and the Orthodox Christians, and the status of women in the Byzantine Empire was elevated high above that of the women in the Middle East and Europe.
bottom border

Byzantium: the lost empire —-> Empress Theodora (Eva Green) 500 – 28 June 548

“The imperial purple makes the best shroud.”

― Empress Theodora

Theodora was the wife of Justinian I who was crowned Emperor of the Byzantine Empire in 527 AD. As his wife, she ruled by his side, as his partner, and her intelligence helped to advance the Empire.

The exact place of her birth has not been agreed upon. While some historians say she was born on the island of Crete off the coast of Greece, others speculate that she might have been born in Syria. Whichever the case, she was brought up as the daughter of a bear trainer who worked at the Hippodrome (a huge stadium-like circus), in Constantinople. She worked there as a mime, and later as a full time actress. At the time, acting was not a highly esteemed occupation especially for women, so the term ‘actress’ was considered synonymous with the term ‘prostitute’. While on stage she was remembered for her daring entertainment skills, off stage however, she lived a normal youthful life and was most remembered for her wild parties.

At the age of 16, she traveled to northern Africa as the companion of an official. She stayed there for 4 years before returning to Constantinople. She stopped by Alexandria, the capital of Egypt and here she adopted Monophysitism. This was a form of Christianity that believed that Jesus Christ was wholly divine and not both human and divine as was the orthodox Christian belief. Monophysites were thus not liked by orthodox Christians since their teachings did not conform to those of the orthodox church. On conversion to Monophysitism, she gave up her former lifestyle, and upon reaching Constantinople in 522, settled down as a wool spinner in a house near the palace of the Emperor. It was while in this humble lifestyle, at the age of 20, that she drew the attention of Justinian, then a government official.

Theodora was not only beautiful, but intelligent, witty and amusing, which is perhaps why she won Justinian’s love so much that he appealed against an old Roman law that forbade officials from marrying actresses in order to marry her. Justinian and Theodora were married in 525. In 527, Justin, the emperor of Byzantium, and Justinian’s father died. The couple assumed control of the Empire and were crowned Emperor and Empress on 4th April of that same year. They ruled unofficially as joint monarchs with Justinian allowing Theodora to share his throne and take active part in decision making.

Perhaps the most significant event during Empress Theodora’s rule was the Nika revolt in which she proved herself a worthy and able leader. During this event, two rival political groups started a riot at the Hippodrome. They set many public buildings on fire and proclaimed a new emperor. Justinian and his officials, unable to control the crowd prepared to flee, but Theodora spoke up and gave a moving speech about the greater significance of the life of someone who died as a ruler, over that of someone who lived but was nothing. Her determined speech convinced Justinian and his officials and they attacked the Hippodrome, killing over 30,000 rebels and emerging victorious. Historians agree that it was Theodora’s courage and determination that saved Justinian’s empire.

Throughout the rest of her life, Theodora and Justinian transformed the city of Constantinople, building it into a city that for many centuries was known as one of the most wonderful cities in the world. They built aqueducts, bridges, and more than 25 churches, the most significant of these being the Hagia Sophia - ‘Church of Holy Wisdom’. To women, Theodora may well be considered a noble pioneer of the women’s liberation movement. She passed on laws prohibiting forced prostitution and established homes for prostitutes, passed rights that granted women more rights in divorce cases, instituted the death penalty for rape and established laws allowing women to own and inherit property. She also provided safe shelter for Monophysite leaders who faced opposition from the majority orthodox Christians, even though her husband Justinian was an orthodox Christian.

Empress Theodora died on 28th June, 548. Her body was buried in the Church of the Holy Apostle, one of the splendid churches that she and Justinian had built in Constantinople. Beautiful mosaics in Empress Theodora’s remembrance exist to this day at the Church of San Vitale at Ravenna in Northern Italy. Even after her death, her spirit lived on, and in this way she was able to have influence on the Empire. Through what she had began, Justinian was able to bring harmony between the Monophysites and the Orthodox Christians, and the status of women in the Byzantine Empire was elevated high above that of the women in the Middle East and Europe.

(Source: annedautriche, via catalinadetrastamara)

¤
top border
bottom border

isabelladeste:

܀ history meme :: and then some ܀ ladies [5/?] Livia Drusilla (30 January 58 BC– 28 September AD 29)
↳ Empress of Rome

The first lady of the Roman Empire through her marriage to Augustus, Livia paved the way for all the women that were to follow by becoming an example of how the wife of the Emperor of Rome should be. Although Augustus refrained from giving her any official titles and it was her grandson Claudius that officially defied her as Augusta, Livia nevertheless managed to slowly and surely create a small power base of influence for herself and for her family. Through Augustus’ promotion of a unified imperial family and one that kept itself relatively modest in appearance and action, Livia helped to enhance her husband’s image through forming her own image as the good wife and mother. As a mother, Livia could access control through the use of her sons (from her first marriage) that she furthered into power. Additionally, her proximity to her husband, a marriage that has been more often than not seen as a close one with Augustus taking advice from his wife, allowed for influence.

Whether or not her contemporaries or modern scholars admired or mistrusted her, there is no doubt of Livia’s importance in the foundations of the Empire. Her good public conduct outweighed much of the more malicious comments about her lust for power and supposed manipulation of her husband. She remained first amongst the women in her contemporary and became a model for some of the empresses that would follow the path she began.

(via veritastemporisfilia)

¤
top border
bottom border

movie requests, part 14 (requested by thefandomicaopens) »

↳ “c’mon, babe, why don’t we paint the town… and all that jazz." - chicago (2002)

(via annythecat)

scrollwork bottom
Theme by Robert Boylan   //   Driven by Tumblr.com